SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (June 19, 2014) Australian, Japanese, and American service members pose for a photo aboard the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force amphibious tank landing ship JS Kunisaki (LST 4003) upon arrival in Cambodia during Pacific Partnership 2014 .

SIHANOUKVILLE, Cambodia (June 19, 2014) Australian, Japanese, and American service members pose for a photo aboard the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force amphibious tank landing ship JS Kunisaki (LST 4003) upon arrival in Cambodia during Pacific Partnership 2014 .

ROTE ISLAND, Indonesia (NNS) — Enhanced eye care combined with upgraded eye treatment has led to improved eyesight for residents at Ba’a, Rote Island, Indonesia due to Pacific Partnership 2014 Ophthalmology subject matter expert exchange that included expertise from Naval Hospital Bremerton.

Cmdr. Brice Nicholson, eye physician and surgeon of Naval Hospital Bremerton Ophthalmology and Refractive Surgery clinic was part of the PP14 team that visited Rote Island and helped provide direct medical treatment and aid in diagnosing vision-threatening illness.  “I always enjoy working boots-on-ground with the local surgeons and technicians,” said Nicholson, who was on Pacific Partnership 2011, as well as prior missions to Sri Lanka, Morocco and Indonesia, along with several similar civilian missions. “Like us, they are just small pieces of the machine. We are the ones who actually take care of these patients. It makes me feel even better because I know we truly make a difference. Whether it’s me doing cataract surgery, or our optometrist handing out glasses, these people wouldn’t be able to see if we hadn’t come there.”

The Rote mission took Nicholson and a joint PP14 team to Ba’a Hospital in Ba’a, Rote Island. The island itself is located off the southwestern coast of Timor, one of more than 13,000 islands and islets comprising the Indonesian archipelago that stretches across the equator from Sumatra in the Indian Ocean to New Guinea in the Pacific Ocean.

“The patients were generally appreciative. The local mayor had all of us over and they held formal opening and closing ceremonies as well. We felt very welcome and appreciated,” shared Nicholson adding that the toughest part was learning to operate in a completely new, sometimes austere, environment where everything is new.

“New technicians, new sterilization and antisepsis techniques, hot and humid working conditions, new instruments, and surgical techniques that we don’t typically use in the U.S. But that is what makes it interesting and what, I believe, makes a better surgeon,” stated Nicholson.

The proximity to year-round sun-light made for dealing with eye concerns such as pterygia (also called surfer’s eye), which occurs more often among people who live near the equator.

“We had lots of pterygia, some bilateral (both eyes). I actually have a few I am going to do in a couple of hours this morning. I taught the Indonesian surgeon how to do grafts, so their recurrence rate should drop notably over the next months. When we do grafts here, we use sutures instead of glue. If someone thought they had post-op discomfort, its minor compared to what could be experienced here,” said Nicholson

Nicholson attested that the visiting PP14 team also tired to share with each patient that they could help themselves and others in caring for their eyes on a daily basis by protecting them against the prevalent sunlight.

“Sunglasses, sunglasses, sunglasses!” exclaimed Nicholson, also citing that as a visiting eye physician and surgeon, he continually took the time to share and go over with his patients on the type of care he was providing them.

“We used translators for most of our communication. I think the most important thing I shared with the local doc was the idea of fostering patient trust and confidence, and to spend a lot of time talking to their patients about what to expect after surgery. Expectations are a big deal and we have to do our best to at least try to help folks with proper education,” Nicholson said.

The hospital the PP14 team worked out of was the only one on the equatorial island and lacked many of the amenities and equipment associated with a naval hospital. But there was an air conditioning unit in the operating room which kept the temperature in the low 80 degrees area.

According to Nicholson the tropical environmental also meant that malaria and dengue fever were present,

“So prophylaxis and hydration requirements were the biggest differences between tropical and the Pacific Northwest. Almost everyone got some kind of virus or GI bug but, to date, I have been spared. This is fortunate because the only reason my wife has any hesitation for me going on these is because I get deathly ill right before I leave on 50 percent of my missions,” related Nicholson.

Despite being well off the beaten path, Rote Island is also a tourist destination, drawing a number of Australians and Europeans to enjoy the sun and surf in a rustic setting. Nicholson was assigned spartan accommodations but enjoyed the relatively sparse lodging.

“We were staying at an austere, but awesome beach resort, with an outside shower and bathroom, staying in a thatched hut. It’s not for everyone, but I loved it,” said Nicholson.

Nicholson praised the combined efforts of the joint PP14 team and the local medical personnel of Ba’a.

“All services and NGOs (non-governmental organizations) were awesome. It was quite collaboration and we enjoyed each other’s company. I can honestly say it was the most cohesive group I have ever worked with, and I miss a lot of them already. The most fun we had was joking around with the local surgeons and technicians – we are all the same really – and having a cold beer at night on the beach with my U.S. and partner nation colleagues,” said Nicholson, citing that commands should continue to encourage and support individuals for these missions.

“Partnership and working together is where it’s at. I haven’t met anyone who didn’t come away feeling like they have gained something, even if it’s just a life perspective, after these trips,” added Nicholson.

Pacific Partnership is in its ninth iteration and is the largest annual multilateral humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Asia-Pacific region. For the people of Rote Island, they understand that.

Some even saw it with their own eyes, due to the care, concern and consideration from a visiting eye physician and surgeon from Naval Hospital Bremerton.

Navy News article By Douglas H Stutz, Naval Hospital Bremerton, Public Affairs

Read More…

Posted by: arbeam | June 19, 2014

USS Pennsylvania Earns Meritorious Unit Commendation

BANGOR, Wash. (June 18, 2014) Rear Adm. Dietrich Kuhlmann, commander of Submarine Group (SUBGRU) 9, speaks to the Blue and Gold crews of the ballistic missile submarine USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) during a Meritorious Unit Commendation presentation at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor. Pennsylvania earned the award for completing the most successful return to service to date for an Ohio-class submarine following a refueling overhaul.

BANGOR, Wash. (June 18, 2014) Rear Adm. Dietrich Kuhlmann, commander of Submarine Group (SUBGRU) 9, speaks to the Blue and Gold crews of the ballistic missile submarine USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) during a Meritorious Unit Commendation presentation at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor. Pennsylvania earned the award for completing the most successful return to service to date for an Ohio-class submarine following a refueling overhaul.

BANGOR, Wash. (NNS) — USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) Blue and Gold crews were presented the Meritorious Unit Commendation (MUC) June 18 in a ceremony on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor for completing the most successful return to strategic service to date for an Ohio-class submarine following a refueling overhaul.

According to the award citation from Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Pennsylvania was recognized for meritorious service from Sept. 2012 to July 2013 during which the ship completed an engineered refueling overhaul (ERO) and returned to service 27% faster than the previous fastest time for a ballistic missile submarine. This resulted in three months of additional SSBN operational availability.

“You not only completed your overhaul period faster than it’s ever been done before, but you did it better,” said Rear Adm. Dietrich Kuhlmann, commander of Submarine Group 9 to the Pennsylvania Blue and Gold crews. “Every milestone and event that you had to go meet to regain your strategic mission proficiency, operational ship-driving proficiency, and tactical weapons proficiency were done better collectively than any boat had ever before coming out of that transition period. This is fantastic testament to the leadership and professionalism of everyone standing here.”

While completing their 32-month ERO and expedited return to service, Pennsylvania also earned a third consecutive Pacific Fleet Retention Honor Roll award.

“This award, while recognizing a lot of work completed about a year ago, is very much well deserved,” said Cmdr. Tiger Pittman, Pennsylvania Gold crew commanding officer. “We were able to accomplish what we did in large part due to the hard work, dedication and teamwork both crews displayed. We couldn’t have done this though without our families. They support us in the long hours, long weeks, and the time at sea, and that allows us to come to work focused and accomplish our very challenging and complex jobs.”

The MUC was established by Former Secretary of the Navy John T. McNaughton in 1967 to be given to a unit for valorous or meritorious achievement.

Pennsylvania Gold crew recently returned home to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor following an Ohio-class SSBN record-setting 140-day patrol. The submarine is one of eight Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines homeported at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, providing the survivable leg of the nation’s strategic deterrent forces.

Navy News article by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Ahron Arendes, Submarine Group 9, Public Affairs

Posted by: arbeam | June 17, 2014

USS Nimitz Visits Victoria, British Columbia

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (June 13, 2014) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) cruises in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Nimitz is underway hosting friends and family day, an event where nearly 400 civilian guests joined the ship's crew for a special one day underway

OAK HARBOR, Wash. (June 13, 2014) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) cruises in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Nimitz is underway hosting friends and family day, an event where nearly 400 civilian guests joined the ship’s crew for a special one day underway

VICTORIA, British Columbia (NNS) — The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) visited Victoria, British Columbia, June 13 to June 16 to support community relations in the area.

While in port, Nimitz Sailors participated in a variety of activities, including a reception held for civilian and military dignitaries, community service projects and sporting events with their Canadian allies.

The reception, held Saturday evening, brought together civilian and military leaders from both nations. “I thank you for your warm welcome and for your enduring partnership,” said Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne, commander, Carrier Strike Group 11 during the reception. “As partnering nations we have shared many successes between our countries. Our nations have a long and enduring history of shared duties and sacrifice around the world, and I think we’re equally blessed to have hard working and dedicated professional men and women who serve in uniform.”

Different speakers, including Consul General Anne Callagan, consulate general of the United States, Vancouver, Canada, and Royal Canadian Navy Rear Adm. William Truelove, commander, Maritime Forces Pacific, repeatedly highlighted the long history of cooperation between the two countries throughout the event.

“It’s through port visits like these that we have the opportunity to showcase to Canadians and Americans alike the long-standing and deep partnership that our navies share,” said Truelove. “We get to increase the awareness of the role that we share in the defense and the security of our great nations.”

Nimitz Sailors also competed with Sailors from the Royal Canadian Navy in softball and basketball. They also went into the community of Victoria to participate in community relations projects, including a beach cleanup, teatime with Canadian veterans and donated time at a homeless shelter.

“We had a great time helping out,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Lauren Perry. “It was an incredible experience.”

The two nations have partnered in numerous multinational exercises, including Rim of the Pacific exercises, task group exercises and Trident Fury.

Navy News article By MC3 Nathan R. McDonald, USS Nimitz Public Affairs

Read More…

140614-N-LP168-067

BANGOR, Wash. (June 14, 2014) Rear Adm. Dietrich Kuhlmann, right, commander of Submarine Group (SUBGRU) 9, congratulates Cmdr. Tiger Pittman, commanding officer of the Gold crew of the ballistic missile submarine USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) following a successful a 140-day strategic deterrent patrol. The patrol set a new record for the longest strategic deterrent patrol completed by an Ohio-class submarine.

BANGOR, Wash. (NNS) — USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735) with its Gold Crew aboard, returned home to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor June 14 following a 140-day strategic deterrent patrol, setting a new record for the longest patrol completed by an Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine.

Pennsylvania Gold’s patrol, which began in January, is not only the longest for an Ohio-class submarine, but the longest since beginning of the Poseidon C3 ballistic missile program in the early 1970s, according to records maintained by the Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile Weapon System Evaluation program.

“It’s an honor. It was a challenge. The job kept calling for us to stay at sea, but we were ready, willing and able, so we stayed at sea and finished the mission,” said Cmdr. Tiger Pittman Pennsylvania Gold commanding officer. “I’m incredibly proud of my crew. I’ve been amazed by their resiliency throughout the entire time, and not only the crew, but the families. We leave and we serve, but they stay home and they serve as well.”

As Pennsylvania emerged from an extended maintenance period in 2013, the patrol had originally been planned to be longer than is considered normal for an SSBN. The crew spent nearly the entire patrol underway, since unlike most other Navy vessels, SSBNs don’t make routine port visits except when returning to homeport.

“USS Pennsylvania Gold’s patrol is an exceptional example of the flexibility and capability of the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine. We had always expected this to be a longer than normal patrol and a highly capable crew made it happen,” said Capt. Mark VanYe, chief of staff at Commander, Submarine Group 9. “When operational commitments changed, we knew the exceptional Sailors serving on Pennsylvania and their families back home were up to the task.

“They have excelled across their entire mission set,” he said. We are glad now to have them home and congratulate them on a job well done.”

Upon their return home, Pennsylvania Gold was greeted by Commander of Submarine Force U.S. Pacific Fleet Rear Adm. Phillip Sawyer, who wanted to personally thank them and congratulate them on a job well done.

“The SSBN strategic deterrent patrol is the most important unit mission in the Submarine Force and vital to the defense of our nation,” said Sawyer. “The Pennsylvania Gold Crew was on the front line of deterrence, conducting critical missions from the time the ship got underway until returning home, and I couldn’t be prouder of what they have accomplished.”

Pennsylvania is one of eight Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines homeported at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, providing the survivable leg of the nation’s strategic deterrent forces.

Navy News Story by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Ahron Arendes, Submarine Group 9 Public Affairs

Posted by: arbeam | June 15, 2014

USS Bremerton: Captain’s Log

Hello Bremerton Navy League Friends -

badfish logoUSS_Bremerton_SSN_698_logoThings are going well on the Bad Fish.  We are in our fifth month of our Docking Selected Restricted Availability at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard.  We have been in drydock since the end of January, and I am very excited at the maintenance and improvements that we have been able to accomplish while we have been in the dock.  We are putting a lot of effort into aesthetic and material improvements, and the ship is going to look and run great when we get out.  This is a much-needed maintenance period, as the ship has been worked hard over the last several years while doing the country’s business.  The ship clearly needed the maintenance, and we have repaired several major components shipwide.  Despite our well-worn appearance when we entered the yard, I haven’t let anyone talk down the Bad Fish, and I have gotten the shipyard to buy in to our terminology – we don’t call her an “old” boat…instead, she is an “American Classic!

To make a classic run takes a special crew, and I am blessed with the best crew in the Pacific Fleet.  Your Sailors have performed extremely well throughout this availability, working hard to improve both the material condition and preservation of the Bad Fish.  There have been some long hours as we push to complete our availability and get back to sea, but my crew has been great – holding their heads high and keeping smiles on their faces.  I’m very proud of them.

To add to that, my crew, led by my capable Executive Officer (Jeff Fassbender who hails from Wisconsin), my stellar Department Heads (Engineer – Rob Low from Michigan, Navigator – Brad Boyd from Ohio, Weapons Officer – Joe Huck from Connecticut, and Supply Officer – Colleton Miller from Kentucky), and my top-notch Chiefs Quarters (led by Wade Tandberg, my Chief of the Boat from Washington State)  have done a great job in developing and running a rigorous training program while we are in the shipyard.  Our training focuses on navigation, submerged contact management, surfaced shiphandling, ship control, and propulsion plant operations.  This training will ensure that we are able to still do our primary job, which is to take the Bad Fish back to sea, ready to go in harm’s way.

I expect that the end of the availability will come quickly for us once we undock in less than a month.  We will have several milestone inspections and events over the next couple months, then we will finally take the boat back to sea during Sea Trials at the end of the summer.  After that, all of our focus will be on regaining operational proficiency and beginning our deployment preparations.

One of the normal events following a shipyard availability is a trip up to the sound range in Alaska, and we will transit there this fall to ensure that we remain in fighting trim.  Following our Alaska stop, we are planning to pay a visit to the best liberty port on the West Coast – our namesake city.  Once our schedule is a bit more solid, we will zero in on the exact dates for our visit and will pass those your way.

I have attached a picture of us heading outbound to sea (taken from the Hickam Officer’s Club), mainly to remind myself that we will soon be headed outbound to “Papa Hotel” – I can’t wait!
USS Bremerton outbound
Please feel free to drop me a line (bringhwp@bremerton.navy.mil) if you want to check up on your boat.

Aloha -

Wes Bringham

Bremerton CO Wes Bringham

Posted by: arbeam | June 13, 2014

Navy Band Northwest Performance Schedule

Navy Band NW Concert Band

June 14, 2014 3 P.M.

Deception Brass, our New Orleans-style brass band will perform at the Seabeck Conference Center to help bolster the relationship with our local community and help celebrate Seabeck’s Centennial Kickoff!

June 28, 2014 5 P.M.

Come and listen to the sounds of famous composers such as Malcolm Arnold and John Phillip Sousa performed by world class musicians of Navy Band Northwest in concert at Shelton High School.

June 29, 2014 3 P.M.

Take a stroll through time with our jazz combo Cascade as they perform live at the Panorama Retirement Community in Lacey, WA.

July 3, 2014 6:00 P.M.

Deception Brass, our New Orleans-style brass band will perform at the Mike Wallace Park next to the Kingston Ferry dock for the Tiny Town two-day celebration in Kingston, WA.

July 3, 2014 8:00 P.M.

Find Passage at the Poulsbo waterfront for the annual 3rd of July celebration!

July 4, 2014 1:00 P.M.

Navy Band Northwest will march in full force at the annual Bainbridge Island 4th of July Parade.  Come celebrate our the birth of our nation with Navy Band Northwest!

July 4, 2014 6:00 P.M.

Come rock the night away at the City of Everett, WA where they will host a celebration with our rock band Passage at theLegion Memorial Park!

 July 6, 2014 3 P.M.

Passage keeps on rocking at the Tacoma Narrows Airport for the 4th Annual Wings and Wheels Celebration in Gig Harbor, WA.

July 19, 2014 6:00 P.M.

Navy Band Northwest will march in full force at the 55th Annual Waterland Festival Grand Parade in Des Moines, WA.

July 26, 2014 6:00 P.M.

Join the fun with Deception Brass, our New Orleans-style brass band at the Seattle Center Torchlight Fanfest!

July 26, 2014 8:00 P.M.

Navy Band Northwest will march in full force for Seattle’s largest event of the year.

July 29, 2014 12:00 P.M.

Join the fun with Deception Brass, our New Orleans-style brass band at the Victor Steinbrueck Park, next to Pike Place Market!

July 29, 2014 12:00 P.M.

Passage keeps on rocking at the Seafair, this time they will celebrate at Seattle’s Waterfront Park.

July 30, 2014 12:00 P.M.

Passage keeps on rocking at the Seafair, this time they will celebrate at Seattle’s Westlake Park.

July 30, 2014, 1:30 P.M.

Join Navy Band Northwest as we celebrate Seafair’s Fleet Week in the Parade of Ships and Flight!

August 1-3, various times – Seafair Weekend!

July 31-August 2, 2014 10:00 A.M.

Join the fun with Deception Brass, our New Orleans-style brass band in Seattle’s Pier 66 where you can get an inside look at U.S. Navy ships, and meet the sailors that operate them!  Tours and performances start at 10:00 A.M.

August 1-3, 2014 12:00 A.M.

Our rock band Passage provides the soundtrack to the world’s most famous aerobatic performers: The U.S. Navy Blue Angels.  Make your Seafair Weekend memorable by joining us!

Capt Christopher QuarlesThis Month’s luncheon Speaker is Captain Christopher S. Quarles, Commanding Officer Naval Hospital Bremerton.

Capt. Quarles assumed duty as commanding officer of NHB on Aug. 6, 2013. For Quarles, being appointed the new commanding officer brings him back to NHB for the third time. A native of Kansas City, Missouri, Captain Quarles received his Medical Degree in 1992 from the University of Missouri, Kansas City, School of Medicine. Upon graduating, he was commissioned as a Lieutenant and subsequently completed his internship in Family Medicine at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Washington. He then served as a General Medical Officer aboard USS Sacramento (AOE 1), earning his Surface Warfare Medical Department Officer qualification. He returned to Naval Hospital Bremerton and completed his Family Medicine Residency in 1997.

Captain Quarles will discuss the many changes that are taking place at the hospital this summer.

Naval Hospital Bremerton (NHB) is a fully accredited, community-based acute care and obstetrical hospital, currently operating 25 in-patient beds and hosting a variety of ambulatory, acute and specialty clinics. The hospital’s more than 1,400 dedicated military, civilian, contract and volunteer staff of doctors, nurses, hospital corpsmen and support staff administer compassionate, professional care to over 60,000 eligible military families residing within its West Puget Sound area of responsibility.

The hospital is also the parent command for three branch health clinics in the Puget Sound area, which are located at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Naval Base Kitsap Bangor and Naval Station Everett. Under the NHB umbrella are Occupational Health, Industrial Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program (SARP).

Naval Hospital Bremerton has three primary missions in support of our warfighters, past and present and their families by: providing exceptional care anytime and anywhere; shaping military medicine through training, research, and graduate medical education; and preparing our forces for deployment.

Doors open at 11 am and the program begins at 11:45 at the Bangor Conference Center Trident Ball Room

Registration:

Please call Evergreen Transfer & Storage at 360 674-2762 for your lunch registration.

  • Please call at your earliest convenience.
  • Please give your name as it appears on your driver’s license.
  • Spell your name to help make certain that it will be correct on the gate access sheet.
  • If you do not have base access, you will need to provide your date of birth.

 

Posted by: arbeam | June 3, 2014

May Navy League Newsletter

NL Parade 2014

The May 2014 Newsletter is a special addition covering the May Armed Forces Festival.

We have had a last minute cancellation for our June Luncheon Speaker. We will let you know as soon as we can arrange a new speaker. The Luncheon will proceed as scheduled.

Doors open at 11 am and the program begins at 11:45 at the Bangor Conference Center Trident Ball Room

Registration:

Please call Evergreen Transfer & Storage at 360 674-2762 for your lunch registration.

  • Please call at your earliest convenience.
  • Please give your name as it appears on your driver’s license.
  • Spell your name to help make certain that it will be correct on the gate access sheet.
  • If you do not have base access, you will need to provide your date of birth.

NHBThe ‘Emergency Room’ sign might be changing to read ‘Urgent Care Clinic’ at Naval Hospital Bremerton, but the same high-level of patient centered care will still be in place for all beneficiaries. “We are not closing our hospital nor are we discontinuing services,” said Capt. Christopher Quarles, Naval Hospital Bremerton Commanding Officer.

The conversion of the Emergency Room to an Urgent Care Center (UCC) by September will be the most noticeable transitional change at NHB. Other planned modifications include the closing of the NHB Intensive Care Unit and the Puget Sound Family Medicine Graduate Medical Education program being phased out by 2016.

NHB’s Emergency Room has traditionally treated a low volume (less than three percent) with actual life, limb or sight-threatening medical emergencies. An UCC provides the ability to deal with a wide spectrum of medical ailments from a mild case of poison ivy to handling broken bones, stitching up cuts, and caring for minor burns or bruises.

The NHB UCC will be available to beneficiaries 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with acute care needs handled on a case-by-case basis.

In emergency cases, patients will be transferred via ambulance to the local Emergency Room at a community hospital such as Harrison Medical Center.

Read More…

Posted by: arbeam | May 29, 2014

Bremerton AFF Culinary Arts Competition

May 10: Armed Forces Festival Military Culinary Arts Competition

AFF Culinary ArtsThe Armed Forces Military Arts Culinary Competition got its beginning as a simple Chili Cook Off on Armed Forces Day. It has grown into a stand alone event at Olympic College on the Saturday before Armed Forces Day Parade, and has become the premiere culinary event in the County. Military teams come from all services and all over the State.

Culinary Specialists (CS) assigned to Naval Base Kitsap (NBK), Naval Station Everett (NSE), Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI), the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Kentucky (SSBN 737), USS Alabama (SSBN 731), the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), Naval Hospital Bremerton, Marines assigned to Marine Corps Security Force Battalion-Bangor (McSFBN) and Soldiers from Joint Based Lewis-McChord (JBLM) competed in the event.

IMG_5502

Each command had teams of culinary specialists competing in seven different culinary categories: cakes, chicken wings, chili, dessert pies, garnishments, hors d’oeuvres, and a Battling Chefs main event.

The contest was expertly organized and run NBK CSC Richard Yanagihara. CWO4 Erick Van Hofwegen, and Cris Larsen acted as Master of Ceremonies.  The highlight of the competition was the “Battling Chefs” contest. Eleven two man teams competed in an “Iron Chef” competition and has to incorporate secret ingredients Calamari, Mangos and Southwest Chipotle Seasoning into their creation.

Tie Breaker

The Judging Panel was led by Rdml Bette Bolivar, Mayor Patty Lent and NBK CO Capt Tom Zwolfer; Chef Chris Plemmons Olympic College, and Chef Acosta provided technical expertise.

IMG_5569

The Battling Chef’s contest was won by CS1 (SS) Michael Grey and CS2 (SS) Larry Hoogstraten from Naval Base Kitsap.NBK BC 1

Competition Winners By Category

Best Hors d’ oeures
 Safe Harbor, CS2 DACANAY

Best Chicken Wings
USS LOUISIANNA SSBN 743, CS1 LALANDE

Best Pie (Dessert)
Joint Base Lewis McChord, SGT BAUTISTA

Best Decorated Cake
Joint Base Lewis McChord, SGT MORRISNBK BC 2

Best Garnish Display
Naval Base Kitsap, CS1 CRISTIBAL

Best Chili (52 entrys)
Naval Base Kitsap, CS1 WOLFSON

Best Ribs
USS Kentucky SSBN 737, CSSA FORBES

Battling Chefs
Naval Base Kitsap, CS1 GRAY/CS2 HOOGSTRATEN

Overall
Joint Base Lewis McChord

IMG_5576

 

 

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.