Posted by: arbeam | July 13, 2017

Navy League Outreach Campaign

This summer our council has participated in a series of projects to increase our visibility in the community. This includes active participation in the planning and execution of the Bremerton Armed Forces Festival, Memorial Day Ceremony, membership in the Bremerton and Silverdale Chamber of Commerce, and presentation booths at the NBK retiree seminars, and Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Keyport’s Health, Heritage , and Hobbies (H3) Day. If you have any ideas to enhance public awareness please contact Larry Salter our membership chairman.

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Posted by: arbeam | July 13, 2017

Navy League Participates in NBK Retiree Seminar

Bremerton Wash. (July 8, 2017) Capt. Alan Schrader, Naval Base Kitsap (NBK) commanding officer, addresses the audience at a military retiree seminar held at the Jackson Park community center. The seminar, sponsored by NBK Fleet and Family Support Center, featured informational booths and workshops on various topics including finances, Tricare, estate planning and other topics focused on setting up military retirees for success.

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Posted by: arbeam | July 12, 2017

MFPU Tour: Jun 8 2017

A group of 26 Navy Leaguers and guests were welcomed to the headquarters of USCG- MFPU (Maritime Force Protection Unit) Bangor for a tour on Thursday June 8, 2017.  After a greeting by unit CO CDR Schoonover and XO LCDR Miek an informative briefing was conducted by LT DeShazo.  Of note, both Schoonover and DeShazo are “short timers” at the unit, with LT De Sazo leaving for assignment in the Cleveland, OH area in two weeks.  CDR Schoonover, who assumed command in July 2014, will be leaving later this year.  We certainly appreciate their service in USCG as well as MFPU and wish them well in their new assignments.

The MFPU at Bangor, established in 2007, is one of only two in the USCG, the other being at Kings Bay, GA.  Bangor and Kings Bay are the two home ports for the US Navy Trident submarine force (SSBNs).  A unique arrangement exists such that because the Coast Guard has statutory law enforcement capability, and not the US Navy, they have been engaged by the Navy to provide a security zone around SSBNs transiting on the surface to and from deployment.  All of their assets, although marked for USCG, are actually owned by the US Navy.  Personnel are USCG but all of their costs are paid for by the Navy.  For both services it is a great relationship.

Although the primary mission of MFPU is the security escort service, the unit is available at all times for “usual”  USCG functions such as rescue, maritime enforcement, etc. as needed.  The Coast Guard motto Semper Paratus (Always Ready) certainly applies to MFPU.  And although all of the other military services are part of the Department of Defense, the USCG is part of the Department of Homeland Security.

Maritime assets used by MFPU include 250′ blocking vessels, 87′ reaction vessels, 64′ large screening vessels and 33′ small screening vessels.  When the requisite units are assembled and creating the 1000′ security zone around an SSBN it is called a “package”.  A pretty impressive one at that!

Following the briefing we boarded a bus which took us to the waterfront area and there we assembled into two groups…each boarding a 64′ large screening vessel.  The security gate to Hood Canal was opened and we proceeded into Hood Canal, up to and under Hood Canal bridge (right side), proceeded parallel to the bridge to the left side, back under and returned to Bangor.  Along the way some of the amazing capabilities of the 64′ boats was demonstrated such as making what amounted to water donuts with a 360 degree spin in place, and while proceeding at speed stopping in 1 1/2 boat lengths and hardly feeling it happen.

We completed the water operation and then reassembled at the nearby galley for a great lunch, finally concluding a great tour and a great experience.  Our sincere thanks to everyone at USCG-MFPU Bangor and, of course, to Byron Faber for arranging this tour for all of us.

Norm Marten

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Posted by: arbeam | July 10, 2017

Tour Planning Update

Here are the upcoming tours.  There are openings for all of them.
July 14 – 9:45 AM SAFE Boats International at Bremerton Airport, then lunch at the Airport diner. Meet at the Safe Boats parking lot 8800 SW Barney White RDBremerton, WA 98312. SAFE Boats International (SAFE) is an aluminum boat manufacturer and leading supplier to military, federal, state and local law enforcement, fire and rescue agencies throughout North America and around the world.
Aug 9USS Buffalo (SSN-715)  USS Buffalo is the newest arrival at PSNS and is awaiting decommissioning after 34 years of active service.

 

 

 

Sept 7 at 8 AM NUWC Keyport Division. Meet at the Naval Undersea Museum parking lot. Keyport provides Fleet readiness support for submarines, surface ships, torpedoes, mines, land attack systems, and Fleet training systems. Support services we provide includes inservice engineering, test and evaluation, custom engineered solutions, and cutting-edge technologies in undersea warfare.

 

Oct 19 – USS John C Stennis (CVN-74)  
Jan 2018 – San Diego Navy base, ship & SEAL training center – waiting for them to confirm dates Probably a 3 day event to include the USS Midway and harbor tour.

 

 

Byron Faber
Home: 360-638-1235
Cell: 360-434-1144
Email: byfaber@centurytel.net

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Posted by: arbeam | July 10, 2017

USS Bremerton Captain’s Log: Jun 27 2017


It has been six months since my last CO log entry.  Since the New Year BREMERTON has been working hard; two thirds of this time has been at sea and the other third addressing material readiness in support of our upcoming deployment.

BREMERTON has been poked and prodded by multiple inspection teams since January and I am happy to report, the crew has performed well each step of the way.  Material, tactical, logistics and engineering readiness have all been inspected by our type and fleet commanders and BREMERTON has been evaluated at standards or above standards in each area.  One mission area that is often overlooked, but that I am particularly proud of is how our people centered programs have fared as compared to our peers; command programs that focus directly on the sailors’ advancement and well being.  Over the last two advancement cycles, BREMERTON has surpassed the fleet average in advancement and leads the waterfront in numbers advanced.  Last quarter alone we advanced half of our sailors eligible.  I attribute our success to a couple dedicated First Class Petty Officers (Command Career Counselor and the Education Services Officer) and the Chief’s Quarters who have made it a mission to raise their Sailors’ individual level of knowledge.

July 22nd of this year BREMERTON becomes the longest serving nuclear powered submarine in US history, surpassing the USS Kamehameha at 36 years and 4 months young.  After our 2016 deployment, this “American Classic” was starting to show her age; rust began to show through and Special Hull Treatment (SHT) began to peel away.  Unsatisfied with the state of BREMERTON’s condition, a dedicated group of deck division sailors took charge.  No weekend or holidays were spared in returning BREMERTON to her former glory.  Over a short two-month maintenance availability, significant blood, sweat and tears were expended in needle gunning, wire brushing, priming and painting BREMERTON and fairing damaged SHT.  BREMERTON is now the envy of the waterfront and I can say she doesn’t look a day over 20.

As I type this log, BREMERTON quietly sails beneath the waves of the Pacific, preparing, for what we believe to be, her final deployment.  The salty understand the challenges that are in store for them over the next 12 months.  The pollywogs prepare only with baited anticipation, curious to know if they are tough enough to endure struggles of sustained at-sea operations; weeks to months without sunlight and only powdered eggs.  Regardless of experience, the men of BREMERTON prepare for deployment selflessly; knowing their sacrifice of six months of freedom is a small price to pay to preserve our way of life as Americans.

V/R

Travis Zettel
CDR, USN
Commanding Officer
USS BREMERTON (SSN-698)

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Posted by: arbeam | June 23, 2017

Jul 11: Luncheon Speaker Vadm Bruce McDonald

Bruce MacDonald is a retired United States Navy Vice Admiral who last served as the 40th Judge Advocate General of the United States Navy from July 2006 to August 2009. Prior to that, MacDonald served as the Navy’s Deputy Judge Advocate General and Commander, Naval Legal Service Command from November 2004 to July 2006. Over his 31 year Navy career, he served in numerous operational and international law assignments, both at home and abroad.  He retired from the Navy in October, 2009.

Vadim’s presentation is particularly timely in view of the recent USS Fitzgerald Collision. His presentation is entitled “Leadership and Teamwork: A Case Study – USS GREENEVILLE Collision with the Japanese M/V EHIME MARU”. Admiral MacDonald was the Counsel for the Investigating Officer for the incident and has many insights, especially the leadership aspects.

In March, 2010, MacDonald was appointed to the Senior Executive Service by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, and served for three years as Convening Authority for the Office of Military Commissions.  He joined Applied Technical Systems, a data analytics, management and software development services company, in April 2013, where he served as its President and Chief Executive Officer until June 2016.

MacDonald graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in 1978 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English.  He received his degree of Juris Doctor from California Western School of Law in 1987 and his Master of Laws degree from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1992.

Location is the Bangor Conference Center, Trident Ballroon, NBK, Bangor. Doors open at 11:00, Lunch begins at 11:30

Registration: Call Realty Station at 360 377-5699 for your lunch registration. Please call before May 2.

Members without base access – processing time can take weeks.

Please provide your name as it appears on your ENHANCED drivers license or US passport, your city and date of birth.

Members without enhanced WA Drivers License or passport need to be escorted by a member with base access.

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Posted by: arbeam | June 12, 2017

NavMag Indian Island Tour: May 19 2017

 

The morning of our tour, with only five participants, we easily fit into one of the Navy’s vans. Bill Kalina, the base environmental manager, drove us to many sites, explaining the history & function of various areas, as well as innovative ecological practices initiated here & then adopted at bases around the world.

Our initial briefing by the CO, Commander Nick Vande Griend, was at the WWII headquarters building. The 2700 acre island was purchased by the Navy in 1939 in preparation for the conflict which could be seen on the horizon. The building was solidly built & very useful today. When sailors manned the base full time, the building contained a 2 lane bowling alley (which is still there-but not currently operational), a galley and pub, game rooms, laundry facilities and offices. There is even some mural artwork, painted during 1942, showing the activities of the Navy & Marine Corps personnel. We really enjoyed the knowledge and humor of the CO, who said this was probably the last tour of his career, since his next step is retirement, hopefully locally.

They can fully load an aircraft carrier in 10 hours. They store ordnance from .22 shells to Tomahawk missiles. They load directly onto warships or on to transports which will replenish ships at sea. Mr. Kalina took us to the areas which had been planned as a sea plane facility, as well as an area where submarine nets, intended to protect against enemy submarines, were constructed.

Throughout the tour we witnessed many successful environmental programs. Indian Island has a growing bald eagle population, with 10 nests The largest nest weighs approximately 2 tons. Neighboring Marrowstone Island has but 2. The Indian Island shoreline serves as a control example when evaluating human impact on other surrounding areas. The Navy works extensively with the area Tribes to preserve their traditional fishing & shell fish harvests, including seeding millions of baby clams as a mitigation annual project. We saw tribal clam cooking settlements (i.e. shell midden sites) dating back several hundred years.

We drove past bunker after bunker, Bill explained that they are designed so in the event of an accidental explosion, the blast would be directed almost completely straight up, and not set off an adjacent bunker. Bunkers are covered with 18 inches of dirt & grass.

Of the 2700 acres, 2100 acres are just forest. Animals to see there include eagles, osprey, deer, bear, cougar, raccoons, occasional elk, and coyotes.

Thanks to Bill & Commander Vande Griend for an extremely interesting & informative tour.


NAVAL BASE KITSAP-BREMERTON, Wash. — USS Nimitz (CVN 68), USS Kidd (DDG 100), and USS Shoup (DDG 86) departed their homeports of Naval Base Kitsap and Naval Station Everett, respectively, June 1, for a regularly scheduled deployment.

This is a previously planned, routine deployment and is not in response to any specific incident or regional event. This deployment is an example of the U.S. Navy’s routine presence in waters around the globe displaying our commitment to stability, regional cooperation and economic prosperity for all nations.

“This deployment is the culmination of months of intensive training and preparations,” said Rear Adm. Bill Byrne Jr., commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11. “The Nimitz Strike Group stands ready to respond to a wide variety of contingencies, be that a humanitarian disaster or a regional incident. We’re honored to be in this position to answer the nation’s call to duty.”

Nimitz, the flagship of the strike group, Kidd and Shoup will make a brief stop at Naval Air Station North Island to meet up with the other ships and units of the strike group. Read More…

 

Please come and welcome the newest arrival to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard! The Bremerton Navy League Council is sponsoring a Welcome Aboard Ceremony at Sam Adams at 6:00 PM Friday May 26.

The USS Buffalo (SSN-715) has come here from Pearl Harbor for deactivation and defueling. This process lasts about a year then the crew is released and the hull is scheduled for recycling.

Posted by: arbeam | May 22, 2017

May 22: Welcome USS Dallas (SSN-700)

USS Dallas (SSN-700) arriving PSNS

Please come and welcome the newest arrival to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard! The Bremerton Navy League Council is sponsoring a Welcome Aboard Ceremony at Sam Adams at 6:00 PM today.

The USS Dallas (SSN-700) has come here from Pearl Harbor for deactivation and defueling. This process lasts about a year then the crew is released and the hull is scheduled for recycling.

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