Posted by: arbeam | February 24, 2015

USS Bremerton Visits Bremerton

Welcome USS Bremerton

BREMERTON, Washington – The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Bremerton (SSN 698) is scheduled to arrive at Naval Base Kitsap on Feb. 25, marking Bremerton’s first visit to its namesake city since 2012.

Bremerton, commanded by Cmdr. Wes Bringham, currently home-ported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, recently completed a shipyard maintenance and drydocking availability at Pearl Harbor Navy Shipyard, and is in the process of working up for it’s final overseas deployment. It is scheduled to decommission here in 2017, after completing over 35 years of service.  USS Bremerton was jointly adopted by the City of Bremerton and the Navy League Bremerton Olympic Peninsula Council in 2011. Read More…

Posted by: arbeam | February 13, 2015

Mar 3: Navy Reserve Celebrates Its Centennial

March 3rd Marks the Celebration of U.S. Navy Reserve’s 100th Anniversary

???????????????????????Bremerton, WA. – On March 3, 1915, Congress approved legislation leading to the creation of a naval reserve. In honor of this momentous occasion, the Navy Reserve will mark its centennial anniversary on Tuesday, March 3, 2015. Navy Operational Support Center Kitsap, located on Naval Base Kitsap – Bremerton, will commemorate the anniversary at their facility (Building 1013) with a ceremony at 1300, followed by a reception with its Sailors. The event will highlight the history of the Navy Reserve and the remarkable contributions Reserve Sailors have made to the nation’s security.

If you are interested in attending please contact Bob Lamb NLT 17 Feb, Phone: 360-769-9108, email: rhlamb@wavecable.com

With nearly one quarter of the Navy Reserve Force providing support to the active duty Navy on any given day, today’s Navy Reserve is the most combat and operationally experienced Force in decades.

“We have a proud Navy history here in Kitsap County supporting local commands and the Fleet. Since the early 1920’s the Navy Reserve has been a part of Kitsap County. Beginning with a complement of fewer than 100 Reserve Sailors, Navy Operational Support Center Kitsap currently provides support to over 800 Citizen-Sailors. Our Reserve Sailors balance the demands of family life, civilian careers, community service and the United States Navy,” said Captain Tami Ryley, Commanding Officer Navy Operational Support Center Kitsap. “But the Navy Reserve’s history is American history, and all our citizens can draw strength and inspiration from its stories.”

The 123 Navy Operational Support Centers located across the country will also mark the Navy Reserve Centennial with celebrations in their respective communities throughout the year.

“Our Centennial commemoration is a truly once in a lifetime opportunity to highlight the Reserve Sailors for their service, and that of their families, to America.” said, Vice Admiral Robin Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve and Commander of Navy Reserve Force.

Navy Reserve Sailors have deployed in every American conflict since the First World War. By World War I’s end, more than 250,000 Reserve Sailors, including 12,000 women, were on active duty. In the Second World War the Navy Reserve contributed 84 percent of the Navy’s manpower, including five future U.S. Presidents: John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, George H.W. Bush. In Korea, Navy Reserve aviators flew nearly 75 percent of the Navy’s combat sorties. Since September 11, 2001, there have been more than 70,000 Reserve Sailor mobilizations.

The Navy Reserve celebrates 100 years of service on March 3, 2015. For information on Centennial events, as well as the history and heritage of the Navy Reserve, please visit www.navyreservecentennial.com.

Our March 10 Luncheon Speaker will be Commander Michael Yesunas, Commanding Officer Naval Magazine Indian Island.

Commander Michael YesunasNaval Magazine (NAVMAG) Indian Island’s mission is to provide ordnance-related support including receipt, storage, issuance, and inspection to the Pacific Fleet and the joint services. NAVMAG Indian Island is the only deep water ammunition depot on the West Coast. They are responsible for the joint transfer shipment of ammunition between the five branches of the military services.

Their Ammunition pier is equipped with the Navy’s largest container crane, capable of lifting 89,600 lbs. The crane rail system allows multiple loading and offloading evolutions for two ships at the same time. The pier is Aircraft Carrier capable.

Cmdr. Michael Yesunas graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1995 with a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in English. After completion of advanced Helicopter Training, he earned his wings of gold in October 1997. Yesunas most recently served as the Commander of Provincial Reconstruction Team Kunar, Afghanistan from February to November 2012. He assumed command of Naval Magazine Indian Island in March 2013.

Our social hour will begin at 11 am; opening will be at 11:45 followed by lunch. Location is the Bangor Conference Center, Trident Ballroom, NBK, Bangor.

Registration!

Please call Evergreen Transfer & Storage at 360 674-2762 for your lunch registration. Please call at your earliest convenience. Cut off for reservations is March 3

Members with out access; processing time takes weeks.

  • Please give your name as it appears on your driver’s license.
  • Spell your name to make certain that it will be correct on the gate access sheet.
  • Provide your date of birth and city of birth.
The Bremerton-Olympic Peninsula Council of the Navy League of the United States recently welcomed Sound Publishing as a Community Affiliate during their January 13th luncheon. Jennifer Zuver (left), Sound Publishing's Sales and Marketing Representative, accepted the Community Affiliate plaque from out-going Council President, Larry Salter (right).

The Bremerton-Olympic Peninsula Council of the Navy League of the United States recently welcomed Sound Publishing as a Community Affiliate during their January 13th luncheon. Jennifer Zuver (left), Sound Publishing’s Sales and Marketing Representative, accepted the Community Affiliate plaque from out-going Council President, Larry Salter (right).

Silverdale, Washington. The Bremerton-Olympic Peninsula Council of the Navy League of the United States (NLUS) recently welcomed Sound Publishing as a Community Affiliate during their January 13th luncheon held at the Bangor Plaza on Naval Base Kitsap–Bangor.

As a Community Affiliate, Sound Publishing is not only affirming support of sea service members and their families, but they are also acknowledging their daily sacrifices to secure our nation’s economic prosperity. As a token of appreciation for their support, Community Affiliates receive an engraved membership plaque, a subscription to the award-winning SEAPOWER magazine and annual SEAPOWER Almanac, four individual Navy League memberships, and recognition at all council membership events and meetings.

Jennifer Zuver, Sound Publishing’s Sales and Marketing Representative, accepted the plaque from out-going Council President, Larry Salter. Salter praised Sound Publishing’s support of the Council’s community outreach programs by providing coverage and advance announcement of Council activities and public events, often targeted to the specific region involved.

According to their web site, Sound Publishing is the largest community media organization in Washington State with its 49 newspaper titles. The company has a combined print circulation of 661,072 and 2.3 million unique visitors online. They also employ more than 600 people in 36 locations around the Puget Sound region and eastern Washington. Sound Publishing is one of the few community newspapers that print all their own newspapers and numerous other publications at a centrally located, state-of-the-art printing facility in Everett.

 

NRNRCCNavy Reserve Region Northwest and Operational Support Center, Everett will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Navy Reserve on March 14th at Naval Station Everett honoring Navy Reserve Sailors, veterans and employers. Rear Admiral Eric Young and Rear Admiral Robert Passmore (Ret) will both be key speakers at the ceremony and cake cutting.

This event will highlight the history of the Navy Reserve and the remarkable contributions Sailors have made to the nation’s security. With nearly one quarter of the Navy Reserve Force providing support to the active duty Navy on any given day, today’s Navy Reserve is the most combat and operationally experienced Force in decades. “We have a proud Navy history here in Everett supporting local commands and the Fleet. Our 330 Reserve Sailors balance the demands of family life, civilian careers, community service and the United States Navy,” said Commander Derek Dwyer, Commanding Officer Navy Operational Support Center Everett.

“But the Navy Reserve’s history is American history, and all our citizens can draw strength and inspiration from its sacrifice and stories.” The 123 Navy Operational Support Centers located across the country will also mark the Navy Reserve Centennial with celebrations in their respective communities throughout the year. “Our Centennial commemoration is a truly once in a lifetime opportunity to highlight the Reserve Sailors for their service, and that of their families, to America.” said, Vice Admiral Robin Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve and Commander of Navy Reserve Force.

Navy Reserve Sailors have deployed in every American conflict since the First World War. By World War I’s end, more than 250,000 Reserve Sailors, including 12,000 women, were on active duty. In the Second World War the Navy Reserve contributed 84 percent of the Navy’s manpower, including five future U.S. Presidents: John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, George H.W. Bush. In Korea, Navy Reserve aviators flew nearly 75 percent of the Navy’s combat sorties. Since September 11, 2001, there have been more than 70,000 Reserve Sailor mobilizations. The Navy Reserve celebrates 100 years of service on March 3, 2015.

For information on Centennial events, as well as the history and heritage of the Navy Reserve, please visit www.navyreservecentennial.com.

Posted by: arbeam | February 20, 2015

Discounted lease helped keep SAFE Boats in Bremerton

Safe Boats Defender

BREMERTON — The Port of Bremerton offered a steep rental discount to keep a major Kitsap County employer from leaving town.

Port commissioners are expected to approve a lease extension with SAFE Boats International next week that will lower the base rental rate for the manufacturer’s facilities by 41 percent, or $200,000 annually. Lease documents were released with an agenda for the Feb. 24 commission meeting.

SAFE Boats had considered pulling up roots in Bremerton and consolidating its operations in Tacoma. Port of Bremerton CEO Jim Rothlin said the port had to weigh the need to get a fair return from its property with the desire to keep its flagship tenant and a prominent employer from departing. “You pull that business out, you pull those jobs out, it doesn’t just affect our lease rate, it affects the community as a whole,” Rothlin said. “There are a lot of things you need to look at.”

SAFE Boats employs about 190 workers in the port’s Olympic View Industrial Park, where it manufactures small boats for law enforcement and military agencies. SAFE is building a series of larger boats at its Port of Tacoma property.

The company’s existing lease in Bremerton is set to expire at the end of June. Executives explored the option of combining operations in Tacoma. Read More…

Posted by: arbeam | February 20, 2015

Apr 11: Navy League Northwest Regional Conference

The Navy League Northwest Regional Conference will be held on 10-11 April at the Bellevue Red Lion Hotel

Regional conferences are held annually to bring together council members from the Pacific Northwest to discuss, share, and discover successful ideas that are working in other councils. These opportunities to learn from each other are not restricted to council officers. All Navy Leaguers are encouraged to come, meet one another and learn about the successes of the Navy League.

Red Lion Hotel
11211 Main Street, Bellevue, WA 98004 (425) 455-5240 (http://mapq.st/1AgkE3l)

2015 NW Region Registration Form
The Conference Registration fee of $60/Person is due by Monday, April 6th. If postmarked after April 6th the cost will be $75 per person. The conference fee includes a Continental Breakfast, Coffee Breaks and Lunch.

Hotel Registration:
Hotel rates from April 10-12, 2015 set at $119 per night plus tax. Guests can call in the hotel directly at (425) 455-5240 – or 800-733-5466 and ask for the Lake Washington Navy League rate.

Schedule:
The Conference begins on April 10 at 1:00 PM with a Nominating Committee Meeting.

Immediately following the nominations Committee meeting we will hold a NW Region Leadership Meeting. There will be a Welcome Reception with No Host Bar at 6:00 PM, followed by a No Host Dinner at the Jonah’s Restaurant and Lounge Friday Evening. All Navy league Members are welcome reception and Dinner.

Northwest Regional Conference Agenda
Saturday will start at 8:00 AM with Continental Breakfast. The Kick Off session will feature our National President Jim Offutt, speaking on the importance of the Local Councils to our Navy League. and the President Elect Skip Witunski discussion future directions.
Offutt5
The topic of the Second General Session will be on Sea Cadets, and Youth Activities (NROTC, JNROTC, STEM, etc.). Information on each topic will be presented, followed by a group discussion.

The Third General session will deal with Internal and External Communications.There will be a formal presentation on Community Presentations followed by a group discussion on Newsletters, Websites, Social Media, News Releases, and Event Announcements. Please bring copies of your newsletters to share.

The Fourth Session will be on Council Best Practices. Each council will be given an opportunity to present two practices that they are most proud of. There will also be a Sea Cadet Break Out Session to allow the various squadrons to get together.

We anticipate a final closing session for evaluation and comments will wrap up and adjourn by 4:00 PM

Posted by: arbeam | February 18, 2015

Manchester fuel depot won’t be privatized

Manchester Fuel Depot

MANCHESTER — The Navy can’t distribute fuel more cheaply by turning over its Manchester Fuel Depot to private industry.

Long-awaited results of a draft business case analysis found that Manchester provides “certain Navy-specific functions that could not be performed more efficiently by a commercial operation.”

That’s a reversal of what the Department of Defense’s Defense Logistics Center said a year ago, when it believed industry could meet Navy Region Northwest requirements at a lower cost. In a Feb. 6, 2014, fact sheet, it stated Manchester is primarily a storage site for jet fuel. With the Navy switching from military-only to commercial jet fuel, it would have more flexibility in how and where it procures, stores and delivers the product.

U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, whose district includes the fuel depot, asked how the agency could know that industry would perform better before the analysis was completed. He welcomed the final results.

“This is good news,” Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, said. “The Defense Logistics Agency listened to the facts and decided the Manchester Fuel Depot should remain a Navy facility. This proves that the depot is still the most efficient way to get the Navy the fuel they need to conduct critical operations in the Pacific.”

The Defense Logistics said Manchester was among 89 supply chain facilities it routinely began evaluating in 2012 to ensure they were operating efficiently. It’s now studying Manchester’s optimal size, said spokesman Patrick Mackin.

The agency said it completed the draft business case analysis in February 2014, finalized it over the following few months and DLA Energy commander Brig. Gen. Giovanni Tuck visited here in May to discuss the scope and future operations at Manchester, Mackin said.

Manchester Fuel Depot 250Manchester is the largest underground fuel storage facility in the continental United States. It provides bulk fuel and lubricant to support military and government vessels of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It has five barges that are loaded at its 990-foot pier and towed to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island or Naval Station Everett. Destroyers pull in from Everett, aircraft carriers from Bremerton and Everett, and submarines from Bremerton and Bangor. Though nuclear-powered, subs still need diesel.

“I’ve always said we’re the best value at the lowest cost provider of services that they can find,” Schmitt said. “Now they validated what we’ve always said. “We’re glad for that, glad for the personnel here, the American taxpayer and the United States Navy.”

Kitsap Sun article by Ed Friedrich

 

 

May 6, 2015
6:30 PM
Sylvan Way Kitsap Regional Library
1301 Sylvan Way, Bremerton, WA

Shannon PolsonBoth success and tragedy can rock our worlds. How can we begin again to understand our lives with a new and unsettling context? Veteran Shannon Huffman Polson (author of North of Hope: a daughter’s Arctic journey) considers our opportunities to choose the narrative of our lives within the circumstances we are given.”

“Shannon’s personal story of courage is both compelling and poignant.  She weaves together her story with the role of story telling throughout history and with today’s culture and media. Her personal experiences combined with this macro perspective is fascinating and creates the urgency to have each and every one of  us explore our stories, values, and goals. Shannon’s “call to action” leaves an indelible mark.” – Christine Birnbaum, New York Life

Shannon Huffman Polson was the first woman to fly as an attack helicopter pilot in the Army’s XVIII Airborne corps and one of the first women flying attack rotary wing aircraft anywhere in the U.S. Army after the lifting of air combat exclusion. She went on to lead two platoons, taking one to Bosnia, and was the first woman to command an Apache attack line company in the 2d Infantry Division in Korea. Polson earned her BA from Duke, her MBA from Dartmouth’s Tuck School and her MFA from Seattle Pacific University. She worked five years in the corporate world before turning to writing full time. Polson is a seasoned speaker at corporate, educational and social events and conferences around the country. She is the author of North of Hope: A Daughter’s Arctic Journey. She and her family reside in the northwest.

Posted by: arbeam | February 16, 2015

NBK Bangor Draft EIS for Service Pier Extension Announced

The Navy has prepared a Draft EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts from the Navy’s proposed construction and operation of new security structures and for the extension of the existing Service Pier on Naval Base Kitsap Bangor.

mapbangor_lwi_speNaval Base Kitsap Bangor, located on Hood Canal approximately
20 miles (30 kilometers) west of Seattle, Washington (see adjacent map), provides berthing and support services to United States (U.S.) Department of the Navy (Navy) OHIO Class ballistic missile submarines, hereafter referred to as TRIDENT submarines, as well as a SEAWOLF Class submarine.

The Navy is proposing and analyzing two projects on the Naval Base Kitsap Bangor waterfront to: (1) comply with Department of Defense directives to protect TRIDENT submarines from increased and evolving threats and to prevent the seizure, damage or destruction of military assets and (2) eliminate deployment constraints and improve maintenance of SEAWOLF Class submarines.

 

The Proposed Actions include:

  • Land-Water Interface
    • Complete the perimeter of the Waterfront Restricted Area by constructing and operating barrier structures at its northern and southern ends using either pile-supported piers or Port Security Barriers to connect the existing on-water Port Security Barrier system and the on-land Waterfront Security Enclave.
  • Service Pier Extension
    • Extend and operate the existing Service Pier and construct and operate support facilities to accommodate the transfer of two SEAWOLF Class submarines from Naval Base Kitsap Bremerton to Naval Base Kitsap Bangor.

The Notice of Availability (NOA) and Notice of Public Meeting (NOPM) for the Draft EIS for the Land-Water Interface (LWI) and Service Pier Extension (SPE) will be published in the Federal Register on February 13, 2015.

The Navy has prepared the Draft EIS, which evaluates the potential environmental effects of constructing and operating the LWI and SPE at Naval Base Kitsap Bangor. Read More…

Posted by: arbeam | February 15, 2015

USS John C Stennis Tour Report

130424-N-TC437-438

Stennis SealOn February 11, 2015 USS John C. Stennis CVN 74 hosted 34 Navy Leaguers and their guests for a tour of this magnificent ship. Stennis is a Nimitz class nuclear powered carrier and was commissioned in 1995. Coincidentally the class carrier, USS Nimitz CVN 68 was several piers away in the adjacent Puget Sound Naval Shipyard beginning a long overhaul procedure. Stennis, on the other hand, recently completed a long overhaul and drydocking and has been to sea several times for trials and recertifications. During our visit the crew was virtually everywhere doing necessary maintenance and drills required to get ready for the next sailing. A full deployment will take place later this year.

Although a Nimitz class carrier has many decks and a significant number of functional areas, tours are pretty much restricted to the forecastle, flight deck and navigation bridge for reasons of safety and ease of accessibility. And due to time constraints and needs of the ship we were not able to have lunch in the galley and the ship’s store was not open for business.

Stennis Anchor Windless

On the forecastle the operations of anchoring and mooring were interestingly explained to us, and that 25-30 personnel are assigned when doing this work. There are many very specific steps taken when dropping anchor or mooring and they need to be executed precisely and safely to avoid damage or injury. When navigating through Rich Passage or similar areas a detail is prepared to drop anchor on a moment’s notice if there is ever a propulsion problem with the ship to avoid going aground. Fortunately this has never happened. The power of an anchor windlass can be imagined when it is realized that each link in the chain weighs 365 pounds.

From the forecastle we climbed up to the 4 ½ acre flight deck where the 70 or so air wing aircraft land, are launched and park. Only one old training aircraft was on the flight deck at this time as the air wing only arrives and departs off California during training and deployment.

During landings, or recoveries, there are 4 wires across the deck with the #3 being the ideal one for the tail hook of a landing aircraft to catch, although any of them will do the job. There is a 5th , a large net like barrier that can be erected in less than two minutes as needed. If a plane misses a catch it uses full military power to take off, fly around and try again. This is exciting to watch but is dangerous and also very loud. The tension in the wires is computer controlled and is customized to the specific aircraft being caught based on weight and size. The wires are used for 125 catches and then are replaced.

There are four steam operated catapults for launching aircraft. A given day can include 120 launches and recoveries, although neither happens simultaneously. But these operations occur at any hour, in any weather and any sea conditions. Wind over the bow is the only requirement and the ship’s 30+ knot speed helps to insure that.

Stennis tour Feb 2015  76

Flight deck control is located at the base of the island with access to and from the flight deck and is where all flight deck movements and operations are controlled. This can include directing an aircraft to an elevator for decent to the hangar deck, repair, refueling, parking or anything else. As soon as a plane lands it is under their control and the famous Ouija Board is used to facilitate keeping track of every aircraft. Scale models, painted nuts, jacks and pins, etc. are used to show status. Several personnel move these parts as directed. The new Gerald Ford class carriers are due to have a computerized replacement of this amazing system but no one has yet been able to successfully design and build something that can react as quickly and multi dimensionally as the present arrangement using human brain power. Time will tell.

USS-STENNIS-Rich-Passage-Mar-2012-e1330917937438

Our last stop was on the navigation bridge after a climb of many levels up the Captain’s Ladder. Everything there is now a 100% digital helm…no more paper charts on board. Numerous radars and other electronics are in place. A recent “close call” was told about when Stennis was navigating Rich Passage. There is a large “blind spot” from the bridge due to the size and shape of the flight deck. A Washington State Ferry en route to Bremerton stopped in the channel such that the helm on Stennis could not see it. Fortunately the electronic navigation aids showed it electronically and there was no collision.

Stennis Tour Group Feb 2015

As we ended our tour we coincided with what seemed like an endless line of sailors and contractors leaving the ship at the end of the work day. And there were still plenty of people on board. We had another great tour thanks to Byron Faber’s hard work, and we certainly thank everyone aboard USS John C. Stennis for their friendly hospitality.

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